The Big Business Of Big Hits: How Blockbusters Conquered Movies, Tv, And Music

Dean Obeidallah

Dean Obeidallah We have seen this self-aggrandizing spectacle of people fact-checking movies with two recent films. The first is the current box office champion, “Gravity,” with the other being “The Butler.” “Gravity,” which stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, follows a space mission that goes terribly awry. Despite its box office success, a chorus of critics have attacked numerous scientific flaws in the film — such as pointing out the allegedly inaccurate way Bullock’s hair floated in zero gravity . But that’s nothing compared to the recent barrage of Twitter attacks launched at the film by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. His tweets ranged from criticizing the direction space debris was depicted as travelling to more nuanced issues such as faulting filmmakers for showing that the Hubble Space Telescope, the International Space Station and a Chinese space station were, “all in sight lines of one another.” This is not the guy you want to sit next to in a movie theater during “Star Wars.” How realistic is ‘Gravity’? I can just hear him whispering things such as: “The Death Star is too big to fly at that rate of speed,” or “Yoda could never survive in that atmosphere.” Look, “Gravity” doesn’t even pretend to be based on anything more than the screenwriter’s imagination. And here’s the biggest thing for people like deGrasse Tyson to keep in mind: it’s science fiction, for God’s sake! You would think the “fiction” part of “science fiction” is something that an astrophysicist could comprehend. And then there’s “The Butler,” the Lee Daniels film about a man who served for decades as a butler for various presidents at the White house. This film was attacked by the left and the right for being historically inaccurate. Some have cited errors with the film’s account of specific instances of the civil rights movement while others expressed outrage over the way President Ronald Reagan was depicted — apparently some view Reagan as a deity. Here’s a spoiler alert (and by “spoiler alert,” I mean a spoiler to people who have never googled or read anything about the film): It was fiction — that means it was made up. There was no “Cecil Gaines,” the butler character played by Forest Whitaker in the film. The film does not even purport to be a bio pic.

Sky Movies comes to BT TV, hell braces itself for cold snap

Sky Movies comes to BT TV, hell braces itself for cold snap

Despite this, both recognize the growing threat of Virgin Media’s Netflix offering, which is why the pair have teamed up to offer Sky Movies via BT’s subscription TV packages. From October 26th, customers can subscribe to 11 Sky Movies channels in SD as well as on-demand content for an additional fee. It’ll all be done via existing Vision+ and YouView hardware, so there’s no need to buy any more gear, although HD-enthusiasts might just have to bite the bullet and sign up with Rupert directly. Show full PR text BT and Sky reach agreement to add Sky Movies to BT TV BT and Sky have signed a multi-year contract which will see Sky Movies made available through BT TV. BT will offer Sky Movies for a monthly subscription that customers can add to their existing BT TV package from October 26. The agreement means that BT will be able to offer its TV customers the option to bolt-on Sky Movies whether they are customers with the YouView box or the latest Vision + box. For Sky, the deal supports Sky’s growing wholesale content business. BT TV customers will be able to enjoy the latest movies across 11 Sky Movies channels, in standard definition, both as streamed live channels and on-demand for those with BT Infinity fibre broadband. For customers with regular BT broadband Sky Movies is only available on-demand. Sky Movies is the UK’s most popular subscription movies service giving access to over 700 different movies on demand including brand new exclusive premieres every week from major Hollywood studios such as Disney, Fox, Paramount, Sony, Warner Bros., and Universal. Sky Movies subscribers can choose from more of the latest and biggest movies first, at least 12 months before any online subscription service. Premieres in October include Argo, Django Unchained, Les Miserables and Gangster-Squad. Zero Dark Thirty and Life Of Pi will premiere in November. The agreement includes Sky Movies Premiere, Sky Movies Showcase, Sky Movies Greats, Sky Movies Disney, Sky Movies Family, Sky Movies Action & Adventure, Sky Movies Comedy, Sky Movies Crime & Thriller, Sky Movies Drama & Romance, Sky Movies Sci Fi & Horror and Sky Movies Select.

They haven’t recovered from the period when they managed for margins. You see the same dynamics in movies, too. Think about trailers you see in theaters. If you’re seeing a Warner Brosfilm, the studio might have three of the fivetrailers. So having a hit helps you create the next hit. If Macmillan publishes Bill O’Reilly’s book “Killing Jesus,”and itsells well,Macmillan can urge him to interview me about my new book [also published with Henry Holt -Macmillan]driving up sales for my book. Hits create hits. And in music? It’s very much the same. One way you see the trickle-down is in concerts. If you are the record label who owns Lady Gaga, and you have a new artist coming up, you can say, “Let’s have the artist play just before Gaga.” Now you’ve exposed the huge Gaga audience to the new artist.It’s similar to showing a trailer before a movie.The hit creates a hit. I think my friends are most familiar with the blockbuster formula playing out in movies, and my sense is that they hate it. They see big loud sequels and adaptations taking over and they want to know who to blame. So who’s to blame? There are a number of people who are negative about blockbusters, and that surprises me.

SKorean, Mongolian Movies Win Awards at Busan Fest

The study involved 96 people at a movie theater. Half of the moviegoers received free popcorn throughout the movie, the other half got a small sugar cube (and wouldve been charged ten bucks for it if this were a real movie). Several ads preceded the movie. According to the research, which was published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, the ads had no effect on the moviegoers who ate popcorn, but a demonstrable positive effect on those who had the quick-dissolving sugar cube. “The mundane activity of eating popcorn made participants immune to the pervasive effects of advertising,” Sascha Topolinski, a researchers, said in the studys report. Going forward, the researchers suggest, the study could spell doom for the traditional popcorn machine in the movie theater. “This finding suggests that selling candy in cinemas actually undermines advertising effects, which contradicts present marketing strategies, the report indicates. In the future, when promoting a novel brand, advertising clients might consider trying to prevent candy being sold before the main movie.” Certainly, any theater looking to eliminate popcorn from the movies would have an uphill battle. Popcorn at the movies is a century-old tradition . But you know whats an even older tradition? Making money in America. Expect every kernel to get branded with its own advertisement soon. On a broader scale, if this leads to entire theaters chawing on popcorn, expect home-theater technology sales to quadruple. Nobody wants to hear that mess.

Chewing popcorn could block ads’ influence in movies, new study finds

Busan International Film Festival organizers said Saturday that the festival’s biggest prizes went to “Pascha” by South Korean director Ahn Seonkyoung and “Remote Control” by Mongolia’s Sakhya Byamba. It’s the first time a Mongolian movie entered and won the competition in the festival’s 18 years. The awards, given to first- or second-time Asian directors, show the festival’s efforts to discover and support the region’s new talents. The organizers said “Pascha,” an unusual love story between a 40-year-old woman and a 19-year-old man, won the jury’s heart with its highly original expression. They said “Remote Control” neatly portrayed tensions between reality and fiction. The jury, led by Iranian director Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, picked “Transit,” Hannah Espia’s drama about Filipino migrant workers in Israel, as a special mention. The 10-day festival that ended Saturday drew more than 200,000 visitors for the second straight year, even as a rare October typhoon forced the organizers to reschedule some events and close outdoor booths by corporate sponsors four days before the festival drew to a close. The fair closed Saturday evening with “The Dinner,” South Korean director Kim Dong-hyun’s independent feature. The festival, which opened Oct. 3 with “Vara: A Blessing,” a Bhutanese drama about classical South Indian dance, screened about 300 movies from all corners of the world. Join the Discussion You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.