From Divided States, A ‘united’ Nation — Thanks To These Men

A longtime journalist with The Guardian, Simon Winchester is also the author of The Professor and the Madman.

So they assembled a convoy 3 miles long, and they trundled off westward as fast as they could. But of course west of Omaha there were no roads and bridges kept breaking, and it was a complete disaster. It took 58 days for them to reach San Francisco at an average speed of 5 1/2 miles an hour. Clearly, if there had been an invasion, it would have succeeded by then. And the conclusion that Eisenhower came to at the end was that America really needs a high-speed road system. To be united this country needs miles and miles of concrete. On radio’s role in bringing the country together Hugely important role. First of all it was Morse, then it was voice transmissions. The first radio station was above a record store, which still exists in Pasadena in Southern California. People loved it. The first proper radio station was in Madison, Wis., and then the rest is history. The national conversation really got going. More On Simon Winchester ‘Vast Ocean Of Stories’ In Biography Of The Atlantic On the regional differences that never really go away I’ve been somewhat involved in this remarkable dictionary produced in Madison, Wis.: The Dictionary of American Regional English, which shows very firmly how the language is very different all over the country. And the food is different.

The United States is still getting rid of its chemical weapons

The majority is in Pueblo, where officials plan to start in 2015 destroying 2,600 tons of mustard blister chemicals stored in projectiles in liquid form. The process is expected to take four years. At the Bluegrass plant outside Lexington, Kentucky, there are 523 tons of mustard agent, VX and sarin nerve agents. Officials predict the job of destroying that arsenal, which is slated to start in 2020, will be completed in 2023. Where is Assad hiding chemical weapons? A convoy of inspectors from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons prepares to cross into Syria at the Lebanese border crossing point of Masnaa on Tuesday, October 1. Inspectors from the Netherlands-based watchdog arrived in Syria to begin their complex mission of finding, dismantling and ultimately destroying Syria’s chemical weapons arsenal. The U.N. Security Council votes to approve a resolution that will require Syria to give up its chemical weapons during a meeting on Friday, September 27. The vote came after assertions by the United States and other Western nations that the Syrian government used chemical weapons in an August 21 attack outside Damascus that U.S. officials estimate killed 1,400 people. U.S.