Food Costs Drive Up Inflation, Odds Of Rbi Rate Hike Rise

Food Stamp Debit Cards Failing To Work In 17 States

India is struggling to lift its economic growth rate, which hit a decade-low of 5 percent in the fiscal year that ended in March. But Rajan has clearly signaled that he will focus on price stability, which he sees as a necessary condition for raising the rate of growth. Higher interest rates are likely to further dent hopes of faster growth, however. That will be a worry for Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s Congress party as it campaigns for five state elections starting in November, a warm up for national elections due by next May. The opposition Bharatiya Janata Party has gained momentum in recent months thanks in part to the performance of the economy under Singh, a veteran economist and reformer. RISKS Inflation is expected to come down in coming months as a slowing economy is likely to keep demand-driven price pressures in check and as this summer’s strong monsoon rains may eventually cool food prices. Yet, price risks persist. Adjustments in domestic prices of subsidised fuel and other imported items following a sharp depreciation of the rupee are still incomplete. Although the rupee gained 5 percent last month, it is still down around 10 percent this year against the dollar, meaning higher import costs for items such as oil, fertilizer, pulses and edible oil in rupee terms. The rupee hit record lows in late August, pressured by the country’s gaping current account deficit and a general exodus of global investors from emerging market assets. Adding to the central bank’s worries, core inflation quickened to 2.1 percent in September. “Rising input costs have again pushed up core inflation on a month-on-month basis,” said Rupa Rege Nitsure, chief economist at Bank of Baroda in Mumbai.

Rick Jenkins, Comedy Studio owner/manager, will be the master of ceremonies and One Thin Dime will provide entertainment. There will also be a silent auction. Items can be viewed at www.foodforfree.org/silent-auction-preview-2013. Tickets are $60 and are available online at www.foodforfree.org. Proceeds support Food For Frees Produce Rescue Program, the largest program and heart of the Cambridge-based nonprofits work. Food For Free offices are at 11 Inman St. To learn more about Food For Free and see a list of Party Under the Harvest Moon sponsors, food and auction donors, visit www.foodforfree.org. The annual Party Under the Harvest Moon, a fundraiser to benefit Food for Free, will be held Friday, Oct. 25, 6-10 p.m., in MITs Morss Hall, Walker Memorial Building, 142 Memorial Drive. Special guests include Ray Magliozzi, Doug Berman and John Bugsy Lawlor of Car Talk; Robin Young of Here and Now; Louisa Denison, food literacy project coordinator at Harvard University; and Peter Ward, Central and Davis farmers markets manager. Rick Jenkins, Comedy Studio owner/manager, will be the master of ceremonies and One Thin Dime will provide entertainment. There will also be a silent auction. Items can be viewed at www.foodforfree.org/silent-auction-preview-2013. Tickets are $60 and are available online at www.foodforfree.org. Proceeds support Food For Frees Produce Rescue Program, the largest program and heart of the Cambridge-based nonprofits work.

Food for Free benefit set for Oct. 25 in Cambridge

“I know there are a lot of mad people,” Berry said. Sheree Powell, a spokeswoman for the Oklahoma Department of Human Services, started receiving calls around 11:30 a.m. about problems with the state’s card systems. More than 600,000 Oklahomans receive SNAP benefits, and money is dispersed to the cards on the first, fifth and 10th days of every month, so the disruption came at what is typically a high-use time for the cards. Oklahoma also runs a separate debit card system for other state benefits like unemployment payments. Those cards can be used at ATMs to withdraw cash. Powell said Xerox administers both the EBT and debit card systems, and they both were down initially. Powell said that some grocery store cashiers had been speculating that the federal government’s shutdown caused the problem, but state officials have been assured that that is not the case. Powell said Oklahoma’s Xerox representative told them that the problems stemmed from a power failure at a data center. “It just takes a while to reboot these systems,” she said. __ Associated Press writers Lisa Rathke contributed from Montpelier, Vt., Dan Sewell from Cincinnati, Tom Murphy from Indianapolis, Sara Burnett from Chicago, Emily Wagster from Jackson, Miss., and Mary Clare Jalonick from Washington, D.C. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow 10. South Carolina Percentage of Population on Food Stamps: 18.2 percent Annual Change in Food Stamps from 2010: 7.1 percent 2010 Total State Population: 4,625,364 9. Maine Percentage of Population on Food Stamps: 18.6 percent Annual Change in Food Stamps from 2010: 8 percent 2010 Total State Population: 1,328,361 8.

Food For Thought closing doors after 42 years in business

Food For Thought, at 2929 E. Central, opened for business in 1971.

Its very sad, says Melinda Foley , owner of the store at 2929 E. Central. We all feel like theres been a death. I know that a lot of people in the community will be very sad to see us go. Foley, 55, has worked in the store since eighth grade and managed it for the last 34 years. She says the store, which her parents started in 1971, is closing because increased competition is making it hard for independent natural foods retailers to compete. The store doesnt have the buying power that its larger competitors do, she says. The competitions just gotten really tough, Foley told me. She noticed things starting to change with Natural Grocers arrival in Wichita in late 2011 . With Whole Foods Market Inc. opening a store here next year , we just felt like this was the time to go out on top, she said. Food For Thoughts closure is just latest development in the local natural foods business. Wichita-based GreenAcres Inc. recently took over management of another longtime natural foods retailer, Whole Foods Association, which has three stores in Wichita and two others in Oklahoma, and it plans to close on the purchase of all five by Oct. 31. Barb Hoffmann , CEO of GreenAcres, told me in August that the deal was all about scale, underscoring the point made by Foley.